1. 16:15 8th Jun 2014

    Notes: 16078

    Reblogged from masteradept

    naamahdarling:

    lilyyevans:

    for the girls the fairytales abandoned

    Someone wrote me a poem.

    (Source: maliahaling)

     
  2. 12:13 6th Jun 2014

    Notes: 49

    Reblogged from empirewaistofmind

    empirewaistofmind:

    ceapcologne:

    gloriascott93:

    empirewaistofmind:

    Having recently re-watched most of the series with friends (in a highly successful bid to introduce them to it), I began to notice some cultural references on the part of the writers:


    1) ‘A Scandal in Belgravia’ bears a strange resemblance to the Martin Amis novel Yellow Dog, and is highly…

    I suspect Gatiss is a Smiths fan. He makes a Morrissey reference in this entry in skulls-and-tea's Sherlock Creator Interview series.

    Ahem. For a young, still-closeted gay boy such as Gatiss must have been back then, it’s quite obvious to be a Smiths fan, I think.

    I assumed it was Gatiss only because he wrote The Great Game. It’s highly offensive to assume an openly gay writer (or closeted as he was back in the day) is the Smiths fan of the bunch or vice versa. It’s essentially a stereotype, not just of Gatiss but also of the other writers, implying that if they’re straight it couldn’t have been them.

    Whoa, my bad. It’s not The Great Game, but The Reichenbach Fall that contains both of those references (I get both confused for some reason). It wasn’t even written by Mark Gatiss but by Stephen Thompson.

    Original post amended.

     
  3. 10:22

    Notes: 42226

    Reblogged from unsharedmemories

    image: Download

    She could have said “STOP STEALING MY BLACKS” and have been equally on target…but she’d be less likely to get away with that.

    She could have said “STOP STEALING MY BLACKS” and have been equally on target…but she’d be less likely to get away with that.

    (Source: taggedrne)

     
  4. 10:17

    Notes: 42226

    Reblogged from unsharedmemories

    image: Download

    Why exactly is this woman a gay icon again? She is horrible.

    Why exactly is this woman a gay icon again? She is horrible.

    (Source: taggedrne)

     
  5. 10:01

    Notes: 2343

    Reblogged from masteradept

    dijpoetess:

    taikikou:

    zig-zaggin-zigzagoon:

    If you can’t see your reflection in her pussy, you ain’t eatin it right.

    Oh God, amazing.

    every sex ed class must play this video it is law

    That’s the greatest shit I’ve ever seen in my life lmfaoooo

    (Source: attack-on-tyrantrum)

     
  6. 09:18

    Notes: 2

    Reblogged from masteradept

    You are swearing now that some day you will destroy me. Remember: far better women than you have sworn to do the same. Go look for them now.
    — — Atia, De Patre Vostro (via masteradept)
     
  7. 08:00

    Notes: 49

    Reblogged from ceapcologne

    ceapcologne:

    gloriascott93:

    empirewaistofmind:

    Having recently re-watched most of the series with friends (in a highly successful bid to introduce them to it), I began to notice some cultural references on the part of the writers:


    1) ‘A Scandal in Belgravia’ bears a strange resemblance to the Martin Amis novel Yellow Dog, and is highly…

    I suspect Gatiss is a Smiths fan. He makes a Morrissey reference in this entry in skulls-and-tea's Sherlock Creator Interview series.

    Ahem. For a young, still-closeted gay boy such as Gatiss must have been back then, it’s quite obvious to be a Smiths fan, I think.

    The episode was written by Stephen Thompson (please note I originally mistook The Reichenbach Fall for The Great Game in the original and subsequent post).

    It’s highly offensive to assume an openly gay writer (or closeted as he was back in the day) is the Smiths fan of the bunch or vice versa. It’s essentially a stereotype, not just of Gatiss but also of the other writers, implying that if they’re straight it couldn’t have been them.

     
  8. 07:59

    Notes: 49

    Reblogged from marybegone

    marybegone:

    empirewaistofmind:

    Having recently re-watched most of the series with friends (in a highly successful bid to introduce them to it), I began to notice some cultural references on the part of the writers:


    1) ‘A Scandal in Belgravia’ bears a strange resemblance to the Martin Amis novel Yellow Dog, and is highly…

    Erm, you know that these stories are originally based on ACD canon, right? The books/shows you mention with resemblances to ASiP/ASiB probably took their inspiration from Conan Doyle.

    Maybe read the books to which you’re referring before assuming someone else hasn’t…

     
  9. 07:57

    Notes: 49

    Reblogged from gloriascott93

    gloriascott93:

    empirewaistofmind:

    Having recently re-watched most of the series with friends (in a highly successful bid to introduce them to it), I began to notice some cultural references on the part of the writers:


    1) ‘A Scandal in Belgravia’ bears a strange resemblance to the Martin Amis novel Yellow Dog, and is highly…

    I suspect Gatiss is a Smiths fan. He makes a Morrissey reference in this entry in skulls-and-tea's Sherlock Creator Interview series.

    Oh awesome, thanks!

     
  10. 23:02 1st Jun 2014

    Notes: 52482

    Reblogged from masteradept

    ghostflo:

    theaubisticagenda:

    kristen-guin:

    Tweets: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9, #10, #11, #12, #13, and #14 

    The president of the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network, everyone. 

    i reblogged this before not realizing this guy was the president of asan!!!! so, in case you needed more reasons the autistic self-advocacy network is AWESOME, here is reason #50789

     
  11. ocarnationfixationo:

    empirewaistofmind:

    Having recently re-watched most of the series with friends (in a highly successful bid to introduce them to it), I began to notice some cultural references on the part of the writers:


    1) ‘A Scandal in Belgravia’ bears a strange resemblance to the Martin Amis novel Yellow Dog, and is highly…

    my uncle produced max headroom, so this is pretty interesting.

    Coolest uncle ever? Hard to believe it’s a reference to anything else, really.

    There are other possible references I’ve since spotted (non-Max Headroom)…may post soon.

     
  12. 21:59 14th May 2014

    Notes: 124218

    Reblogged from masteradept

    the-real-goddamazon:

    nothingman:

    Doing The Pledge of Allegiance every school day for 4 or 5 years is one of those things that don’t seem strange when you’re young

    But then you get older and you realized “yeah, swearing your allegiance to a flag for about 200+ days out of 365 day year…

     
  13. Some relatively obscure intertextuality found in Sherlock…

    Having recently re-watched most of the series with friends (in a highly successful bid to introduce them to it), I began to notice some cultural references on the part of the writers:


    1) ‘A Scandal in Belgravia’ bears a strange resemblance to the Martin Amis novel Yellow Dog, and is highly likely a tip of the hat. Both share the following features:

    -a Royal scandal involving footage of a sexual nature
    -the scandalous material is used as leverage for protection
    -a subplot involving a plane crash
    -a woman in the sex industry tries to seduce a man with hidden motivations, ultimately in vain

    2) Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss and Stephen Thompson are probably Smiths fans. In The Reichenbach Fall:

    -Kitty Riley: ‘You’re going to need someone on your side.’

    -Sherlock and Watson run in front of a double decker bus (‘There Is A Light That Never Goes Out’)


    3) ‘A Study in Pink’ was *possibly* inspired by the X-Files episode ‘Tithonus’. 

    -In both episodes, a serial killer is suspected to be behind a string of strange deaths, but none of the investigators can exactly explain how a murderer theoretically could have done it.

    -The suspected murderer takes the lead investigator (Scully in the X-Files) for a car ride to explain how he did it.

    -The investigator almost dies as a result in the end, only to be saved by a colleague.


    4) The end of season 3 is likely a (fucking awesome) reference to the Max Headroom broadcast signal intrusion. Doubling the goodness and bringing the intertextuality full circle, one of the broadcasts made by the still-to-be-found intruder 30 years on was during Doctor Who, a show that was also later revived by Moffat and Gatiss, the creators of Sherlock.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Headroom_broadcast_signal_intrusion

     
  14. 16:02 24th Apr 2014

    Notes: 29535

    Reblogged from masteradept

    ‘You don’t actually get over things… you incorporate them. They become part of everything you are. I don’t mean that you walk about crying all the time. But you change.’
    — When You’re Falling, Dive: Lessons in the Art of Living, by Mark Matousek  (via moonsads)

    (Source: kissesandcollisions)

     
  15.